1.0 Introduction

Description

Benefits

Commonly Asked Questions and Their Answers


1.0 Introduction

The purchasing card is the primary instrument for making small value dollar purchases for government. Its use has increased the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of government purchases; however, it has not replaced the reliance on sound procurement practices and effective financial controls.

The Province of British Columbia purchasing cards are currently issued through the Bank of Montreal (BMO) MasterCard program.

Description

The purchasing card is a corporate liability charge card. Cards are issued to designated individuals to make purchases on behalf of the government. Cardholders are not personally liable for any unauthorized purchases made with the card if the card has been lost or stolen; however, they are personally responsible for unauthorized purchases resulting from inadvertence, carelessness or intentional misuse.

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Purchases that are made in the name of the government with the purchasing card are subject to PST and GST/HST.

Benefits

The Purchasing Card Program provides an easy, low cost payment processing tool that increases the efficiency of the procurement and accounts payable functions within government, thus reducing costs. It replaces some traditional financial controls with electronic controls. The primary advantage of the card is the efficiency it achieves in combining many purchases into one payment.

The specific benefits of the Purchasing Card Program are:

  • reduced costs of government purchasing;
  • improved timeliness of payments to suppliers;
  • improved control over government purchasing; and
  • improved management reporting on government purchasing.

Commonly Asked Questions and Their Answers

Question:

 

How was I selected to be a cardholder?

Answer:

Ministry-specific procedures for determining who receives cards may differ, however, cards are generally issued to personnel who make purchases on behalf of government as part of their normal duties.

Question:

I have never been involved in purchasing before. How will I know what I can and cannot buy with the card?

Answer:

You should be given direction from your expense authority; however, generally, purchases are for business purposes only. The Cardholder Information Guide contains the central agency rules about the use of the purchasing card. Chapter six of this manual contains a decision guide that will help you determine whether a potential purchase on the purchasing card is allowed. Public sector purchasing policy is published in the Core Policy and Procedures Manual, chapter six. Your ministry purchasing card coordinator and alternate are knowledgeable in this area, and it is their responsibility to ensure that you know the rules before you are issued a card. Shared Services BC also makes purchasing training available to you.

Question:

What if purchasing is not in my job description?

Answer:

If your job content changes significantly, you can ask to have your job description reviewed. Regardless, if you are identified as the logical employee in your area to make purchases, you will be required to make purchases with the card when directed.

Question:

Will having a purchasing card affect my personal credit rating?

Answer:

No. The charge account is in the name of the Province of British Columbia. You are only an authorized purchaser on that account. The only information that is available is from the application form (your name, work address, etc.) and there will also be records of the purchases made with your card.

Question:

Will I be responsible if the card is fraudulently used without my knowledge?

Answer:

If you followed reasonable precautions to safeguard your card, you will not be held responsible. However, it is your responsibility to promptly report the card lost or stolen and you may be expected to assist in a forensic investigation.

Question:

What are "reasonable precautions"?

Answer:

There may be particular requirements in your ministry, but generally, they amount to common sense. Treat it much as you would your own card, although you may want to leave it in a safe place at work for weekends or vacations. Another way to think of it is as petty cash:

  • don't flash it around or leave it visible and unattended;
  • never lend it or give permission to others to use it for phone purchases;
  • make sure you have signed the card.

 

Question:

What if the government is billed for an item that I did not purchase? Will I have to pay for it?

Answer:

You will not be required to personally pay for any charge that results from your card being lost or stolen. Charges made for your personal benefit by you or others who have access to your card are your responsibility. If you make such purchases, you could also be subject to disciplinary measures for misusing the card. It is your responsibility to ensure that the card and card number are kept secure and not accessible to co-workers, family members or others.

 

Question:

What if the expense authority does not remember telling me to buy something? Will I be held financially responsible?

Answer:

You should obtain written purchase authorization (email is acceptable) in advance from your expense authority where possible, particularly if the purchase is for $1,000 or more.

Question:

I am opposed generally to credit cards and do not have any myself. Do I have to use the purchasing card?

Answer:

There are electronic controls to prevent anyone from charging more than their established limit, which should be based on normal purchasing patterns. The account balance will be paid in full by the government monthly, thus, no large balances can be accumulated.

If you are identified as the logical employee in your area to make purchases, you will be required to use the card, just as you would have to use a computer if you were a secretary or financial officer.